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GIUSEPPE VERDI, UN BALLO IN MASCHERA



Venice: La Fenice Opera House

Conductor: Myung-Whun Chung

Director: Gianmaria Aliverta

Sets: Massimo Checchetto

Costumes : Carlos Tieppo

Lighting: Fabio Barettin

Choreography: Barbara Pessina

running time: 3h20'
Act 1: 1h0'
interval: 0h25'
Act 2: 0h30'
interval: 0h25'
Act 3: 1h0'

Dates and times

Day

Date

Time

Description

Sale

fri

2017-11-24

19:00

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Not available

sun

2017-11-26

15:30

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wed

2017-11-29

19:00

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fri

2017-12-01

19:00

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sun

2017-12-03

15:30

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cast

Riccardo Francesco Meli
Amelia Kristin Lewis
Renato Vladimir Stoyanov
Oscar Serena Gamberoni
Silvano William Corrò
Ulrica Silvia Beltrami
Samuel Simon Lim
Tom Mattia Denti
Un giudice Emanuele Giannino

Un servo d’Amelia
Roberto Menegazzo (24, 29/11 - 3/12)
Dionigi D’Ostuni (26/11 - 1712)

Conductor Myung-Whun Chung
Director Gianmaria Aliverta
Sets Massimo Checchetto
Costumes Carlos Tieppo
Lighting Fabio Barettin
Choreography Barbara Pessina
 
La Fenice Choir and Orchestra
Chorus Master Claudio Marino Moretti

Children Choir
Chorus Master Diana D’Alessio

La Fenice Opera House new production
english surtitles

listen to the opening season live from 7pm on World concert Hall, many thanks to Radio Rai3






A tangled maze in which jealousy, fate and friendship play a fundamental role and in which Verdi’s music guides us through an enthralling story in which a monarch can disguise himself as a fisherman and a minuet can turn into a funeral march.
Un ballo in maschera (Rome, Teatro Apollo, 1859) is certainly one of the composer’s most popular operas; it is also the one in which, based on the classical triangle of romantic melodrama (tenor-soprano-baritone) there are a great number of scenes that, by moving the axis of the action from the interior to the exterior in continuation, are a perfect mirror of the dualism that dominates the gestures of the protagonists in the drama, all of whom are perpetually divided between passion and duty.